Flu Vaccine and Egg Allergy Children 2016

There are two major organizations who have provided flu vaccine guidance; the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

Thankfully, the recommendations have been very similar.

The AAP is child-focused and has the input from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI) as well as the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI). The CDC also has significant input into their recommendations and they are intended for all age groups. In our allergy clinics we abide by the AAP recommendations.

 

From the AAP

 

All children with egg allergy can receive influenza vaccine with no additional precautions from those of routine vaccinations.

 

The Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, states that special precautions regarding medical setting and waiting periods after the administration of IIV to egg-allergic recipients beyond those recommended for any vaccine are no longer warranted. Therefore, the algorithm used beginning in the 2011–2012 influenza season to guide vaccination precautions on the basis of the severity of the allergic reaction to eggs is not necessary.

 

The CDC statements (from the MMWR) regarding egg allergy are as follows;

 

 

  • Removal of the recommendation that egg allergic recipients should be observed for 30 minutes post vaccination for signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction.  Providers should consider observing all patients for 15 minutes after vaccination to decrease the risk for injury should they experience syncope, per the ACIP General Recommendations on Immunization.
  • A recommendation that persons with a history of severe allergic reaction to egg (ie., any symptom other than hives) should be vaccinated in an inpatient or outpatient medical setting (including, but not necessarily limited to hospitals, clinics, health departments, and physician offices), under the supervision of a health care provider who is able to recognize and manage severe allergic conditions.The egg-allergic population is at no increased risk of a severe reaction to the flu vaccine due to egg content and as with all vaccine policies, flu vaccines should be given in environments that are equipped to handle severe allergic reactions.

The egg-allergic population is at no increased risk of a severe reaction to the flu vaccine due to egg content and as with all vaccine policies, flu vaccines should be given in environments that are equipped to handle severe allergic reactions.

FEL 9/14/2016

September 14, 2016 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: ,  · Posted in: Egg Allergy, Influenza vaccine

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